OS cross-pollination and what it means for the Mac and iPad

macOS Big Sur and iPadOS 14 side-by-side

If you’ve been a Mac user for a long time, you know that the community can be fickle. On one hand, there’s a consistent complaint that the Mac platform doesn’t get nearly enough attention from Apple compared to iOS/iPadOS. On the other hand, you know that this community is resistant to change. Every time there any significant changes to macOS’ look and feel, no matter how small, there’s seems to be immediate skepticism. The design changes coming to the Mac signify something bigger. It’s being introduced as part of a broader vision that will be brought forth when all Macs transition to Apple Silicon.

But change can be good. The changes coming to macOS Big Sur are divisive because the OS is clearly adopting a more iPad-like look and feel. It’s going to be different, and I would argue it’s a much more drastic design overhaul than the introduction of Yosemite in 2014. Many folks have focused on the iPad influences on the Mac, but I’d argue there’s more of a cross-pollination between these platforms. It’s clear to me that the platforms aren’t merging (at least not yet). But both are borrowing features from each other. This is an ecosystem play. These design changes will make it considerably easier to switch between the Mac and iPad, making owners of both happy campers. I’m not brave enough to install beta software on my primary machines, but from what I can tell macOS Big Sur and iPadOS 14 tells us a lot about the future of these platforms.

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Apple Silicon: What it means for the Mac and the computer industry

Apple Silicon graphic WWDC 2020
Apple announced that it was transitioning the Mac from Intel to Apple Silicon

It’s no longer a rumour. Last week, Apple announced it was transitioning its entire line of Mac computers from Intel chips to its custom “Apple Silicon” over the next two years. Why is this transition so important? And, what will this mean for the Mac and the computer industry moving forward?

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How to migrate your data to a new Mac

Working from home during COVID-19 means we need a decent computer. Unfortunately, with the economic uncertainty that the pandemic has brought, it’s not so easy to plunk down $1500 or more for a new laptop. The good news is that our laptops are lasting longer than ever.

I recently upgraded to a beefier MacBook Pro 16″, since I use my laptop for work, graphics, audio production and programming. Thankfully, my old 2013 13″ MacBook Pro is no slouch (see specs at bottom) and I got the battery replaced early last year. My wife showed interest since she has an older, slower version of the same computer. For Mac users, there are built-in tools, as well as some tricks, that can help you migrate data between computers. Here are some strategies for migrating the data and getting your computer organized.

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Trickle down technology: The 2020 iPhone SE is released

I discuss the release of the new 2020 iPhone SE and what it means for the tech industry. I dub this the year of “trickle-down technology.”

It’s the meaning behind this device that I find so fascinating. With the entry-level iPad, Apple was able to use an older design and a slower (though still blazing fast) CPU to get the tablet’s price point down. Aside from the recycled body, this iPhone has entirely new internals. That means all the Apple’s phones run the same CPU, at least until new devices come in September. Why not do this for their tablets? Why can’t the iPad, iPad Air, and iPad Pro all run the A12Z and keep the price variations. Perhaps this is the end-goal.

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iPadOS 13.4 impressions: Growing up means more to learn

Now that I’ve had a week or more to play around with the cursor support in iPadOS 13.4, I’m ready to share some brief thoughts and impressions. There’s lots of coverage of this on all the tech websites, so I won’t retread old ground. What’s most interesting to me is what’s to come. The last two years of iPad software updates have been productivity-focused, and it’s likely there’s more to come for iPadOS 14 and beyond.

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A productive update: Impressions of the 2020 iPad Pro

What better time to launch a new iPad than during a global pandemic. Am I right?

In this article I provide my take on the new 2020 iPad Pro features, based on other hands-on reviews from around the web. While this is a fairly minor update, there are a few interesting tidbits to be found – specifically the increase in RAM and new lidar camera system.

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Bane, blessing, or just something different? iPadOS for multitasking and productivity (Tech Bytes post)

With the introduction of iPadOS, the iPad is now a viable productivity machine. But, its approach to multitasking and gesture controls are starkly different from the Mac. In this article I examine two things. iPadOS has been characterized as considerably more complicated than previous iPad versions of iOS. I compared iOS 12 and iPadOS to see how much gesture complexity has been added to the iPad platform. I also broadly compare the iPad and Mac’s multitasking gestures, number of keyboard shortcuts, and overall approach to app windowing to answer the following question. Is the iPad (and iPadOS) a capable productivity platform when compared to traditional desktop operating systems (OS), or is it simply a different take on how work should be done?

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